The Tiny Guide To Capturing Fireworks In Their Total Glory – part 2

6. Turn on noise reduction

It will take a few seconds for your camera to remove the “noise” in a photograph, preventing you from taking another shot immediately. Time your shots carefully.

7. Use the self-timer to reduce vibration

8. Use your camera’s fireworks setting

It will help you gauge and fine-tune your settings. Really helpful.

9. Focus on infinity

We strongly recommend shooting in full manual mode if you have the ability. Set your focus to just less than infinity (or choose a landscape setting if you can’t manually adjust focus) and use an aperture of f/8 to f/16.

10. Use long shutter speeds: 2-3 seconds or longer

This is the most important camera setting you’ll need to worry about. At any given moment, fireworks are just a bunch of bright points of light. What makes them interesting is how their quick motion across the night sky illuminates a path and creates beautiful streaks and patterns. Your eye sees it, but with a fast shutter speed, your camera doesn’t.

So to give your camera a chance to record those streaks and patterns, you need to make sure your shutter is open long enough to get them in. That means at minimum a full second, and possibly up to 15 seconds or more. You’ll want to experiment with different durations to see what works best.

How to do it: If your camera allows full manual control, it’s easy. Just set your shutter speed to whatever you want. If your camera doesn’t give you full control, put it in the mode that gives you the most control and turn off the flash. If you click the shutter to snap the photo while a rocket’s still rising and before it’s exploded, your camera should automatically meter for a long exposure and set the shutter speed appropriately.

11. Most importantly, have fun, be creative and experiment!

Take as many photos as you want, take in the experience and enjoy the fun. You can always delete the bad ones later on.

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